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My blog has been changed to make it more appealing for those who have New England ancestors and want to see the area through photos. Things I’ll include are typical white New England churches, libraries showing their genealogical collection, historical societies, cemeteries, war memorials, in general, anything to do with history.

For four years I’ve blogged mostly about my personal genealogy in New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire), New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. I still will, can’t forget my own roots.

Please check out the labels on the right side for articles. The header tabs at the top are a work in progress.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

My Perfect Research Project


This post describes everything I enjoy doing with my genealogy research and it combines several of my other interests. Among them are two library visits, getting help from two librarians, a surname I knew, a very interesting will to transcribe, two honor rolls to transcribe, solved transcription problems, a fun search for the burial place, I was able to take all the photos I wanted. Based on all my information, I was able to place Aaron in my tree, thanks to great records in NH, MA and CT. And if all this wasn't enough, I discovered that Aaron and his wife married in my city of Lowell, Massachusetts, about 18 miles away from his New Hampshire home. I'll never know why they came here because only their names were on the register, none of the regular bits of information were listed. My story begins when I passed by a library in the dead of winter.

Who was this Aaron Cutler who had a Library named after him? Soon I was searching online for information, because I was positive he and I were related, but I didn't find very much. I decided to wait until spring to go back to the library and speak with the librarian in Litchfield, New Hampshire. Neither she nor the town historian, whom I spoke with on the phone,  knew where he was buried. Recently, I discovered his death certificate online and it stated he died in Hudson, NH and was buried in Londonderry, NH, the town where he was born. His wife was buried with her former husband. Londonderry is next to Litchfield and when blogger friend, Heather Wilkinson Rojo mentioned to me that the library had cemetery books showing where the plots were and some had photos, I called Leach Library immediately. Yes, Aaron was buried there, as were some family members and these had photos! I was at the library within two hours after that phone call.

Below are several interesting things I want share in this blog post. First, a nice photograph of Aaron Cutler hug prominently on a wall in the Library. Second, two Honor Roll plaques located in the porch of the library, both transcribed. Third, a small screen shot of the will, showing that I had an easy time transcribing his long will, with 17 items (it lists many people, many who are receiving a share or more of American Woolen stock). Fourth, a photo of Aaron's resting spot with brother George in the Valley Cemetery in Londonderry.

Aaron is my 4th cousin, 4 times removed. Normally, I don't spend much time researching distant family members. However, in this case, I wondered why this Cutler was in New Hampshire, since all mine were in Cambridge Farms (Lexington), MA, then in Killingly, Connecticut and my most recent, Manasseh Cutler was in Hamilton, MA. When I discovered Aaron's father was born in Killingly, I knew I had a family member.

A small tip. if you are having difficulty in getting all your information to make sense, you might be doing what I did. My problem was with the transcribers, some had Cutler spelled at Cutter, and several had Lemuel as Samuel (his father). But, I pretty much blame myself because I tend to use the exact search on Ancestry. Don't use the exact search, but select Exact & similar for first and last names. For birth date, use +/- two years.




Aaron Cutler, Donor of the Cutler Library Fund

HONOR ROLL
1941   --   1945
TOWN OF LITCHFIELD

ARTHUR L. ADAMS JR.
WILLARD G. BILODEAU
JOHN C. BOURDON
CHARLES G. BRETTELL
HERBERT S. BRETTELL
ARTHUR G. CHIMIKLIS
PERLEY D. COLBY
WALTER A. CROWELL
FREDERICK C. GOFFE
LEWIS C. GOFFE
CHARLES GOTT
HAROLD J. HILL
RAYMOND H. JACKSON
MICHAEL JANKOWSKI
ROBERT G. JERRY
ADRIEN A. LABRIE
PHILIPPE R. LABRIE
ALPHEGE LAFRENTERE
CHESLEY L. LAMPER JR.
DANIEL LAPIN
ERNEST LAPIANTE
JOHN P. LAVOIE
LEONARD D. LAVOIE
LIONEL E. LAVOIE
CLESSON W. LEACH
GLENN S. LEACH
LUCIEN R. LEMAY
*  JOSEPH R. MARTINEAU
CHRISTINE S. MORRILL
FRANK MORTON
JOHN E. NELSON
CHARLES M. PARKER
ARTHUR N. PELKEY
CAMILLE E. ST. AMAND
FERNAND L. ST. ARMAND
ANDREW M. SEVIGNY
DONALD M. SHERK
WALDO E. SMALL
WALTER J. STOCKLEY
AUGUSTUS YANUSZEWSKI
* DIED IN SERVICE

IN MEMORY AND HONOR OF THE
MEN OF LITCHFIELD
WHO SERVED THEIR
COUNTRY IN THE
1917     WORLD WAR     1919
U. S. A.

* CORP. WM. HENRY HOLLAND
PVT. CLARENCE W. HAIGHT
WILLIAM R. HOPWOOD
CLAUDE J. HOPWOOD
HENRY MOREAU
CLIFFORD SAUNDERS

U.S. N.
BENTON C. MORGAN
EARLE J. HOPWOOD




505

Will and Codicil.
Aaron Cutler

Know all men by these presents, That I, Aaron Cutler of Hudson, in the County of Hillsborough and State of New Hampshire, being of sound mind and memory, but knowing the uncertainty of life, do make and public this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made.

FIRST:  I direct my executor hereinafter named to pay all of my just debts and funeral charges as soon after my decease as the same may be found convenient.

SECOND:  I give and bequeath to Lottie Cutler, wife of William B. Cutler, of Tekamah, Nebraska, ten shares of American Woolen stock.

THIRD:  I give and bequeath to my nephew William B. Cutler of Tekamah, Nebraska, my gold watch and chain, and also my silver table knives and forks and spoons.

FOURTH:  I give and bequeath to Charles H. Baldwin of Nashua, New Hampshire five shares of American Woolen stock.

FIFTH:  I give and bequeath to the Baptist Church of Hudson, New Hampshire, its successors and assigns, one share of American Woolen stock, the income from the same to be used for the following purpose, to wit;- for prizes to be awarded children attending the Sabbath School, between the ages of five and fifteen years, the preference to be given to those showing the most proficiency in recitation and in general deportment.

SIXTH:  I give and bequeath to Frank A. Lovejoy of Hollis, New Hampshire, five shares of American Woolen stock.

SEVENTH:  I give and bequeath to Grace T. Pierce of Scranton, Pa., ten shares of American Woolen stock.

EIGHTH:  I give and bequeath to William W. Baker of Hudson, New Hampshire, one share of American Woolen stock.

NINTH:  I give and bequeath to Maud S. Andrews of Hudson, New Hampshire, one share of American Woolen stock.

TENTH:  I give and bequeath to Lillian S. Winn, now in the employ of Proctor bros. and Co., in said Nashua, one share of American Woolen stock.

ELEVENTH:  I give and bequeath to Jessie Buffum, formerly wife of Leo Buffum, of said Nashua, who is now keeping house for me in said Hudson, five shares of Pressed Steel Car Stock, provided and on the condition that she shall continue to remain with me as my housekeeper as aforesaid, until my decease. But if she should neglect and refuse to so remain with me then this gift if to be null and void.

TWELFTH:  I give and bequeath to Fred E. Todd of Boston, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, three shares of American Woolen Stock.

THIRTEENTH:  I give and bequeath to Millie Cutler of Culdesac, in the State of Idaho, eleven shares of Pennsylvania Railroad Stock.

FOURTEENTH:  I give, bequeath and devise to the town of Litchfield, in the State of New Hampshire, all the rest, residue and remainder of my estate, to be
506
same personal, real or mixed, wherever located and wherever found, unto the said town, its successors and assigns, for the purpose of the erection, furnishing and maintenance of a Public Library, upon the express condition that the citizens of said town give land upon which to erect the same. Said land to be located within one-quarter of a mile of the town hall. Said Library to be of brick and slate. And to be known as “The Aaron Cutler Memorial Library.”

FIFTEENTH:  Should said town of Litchfield decline to accept the gift of said rest, residue and remainder of my estate as herein set forth, then the same is to be distributed pro rate among the other beneficiaries herein named.

SIXTEENTH:  It is my will further, and I so declare it that should any legatee or devisee, or both, in this will named, contest the same, then the legacy or devise, or both, to the said legatee or devise, or both, so contesting, shall be null and void and of no effect.

SEVENTEENTH:  I nominate and appoint Charles G. Pillsbury of Londonderry, New Hampshire, sole executor of this will.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this seventeenth day of December 1912.
Aaron Cutler.   (Seal.)
          Signed, sealed and declared to be his last will and testament by said Aaron Cutler in our presence, who in his presence and in presence of each other and at his request have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses.

Alice P. Parker
Mary L. Hammond
Edward E. Parker.

507
Will and Codicil.

CODICIL.

WHEREAS I have heretofore made my last will and testament, bearing date of September 17, 1912, I now make and declare this a codicil to said will and hereby revoke the ninth paragraph of said will, in which I bequeath One share of American Woolen Stock to Maud S. Andrews, declaring said paragraph void.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 25th day of January, 1917.,
Aaron Cutler,   (Seal.)

          Signed, sealed and declared to be a codicil to his last will and testament by the said Aaron Cutler, in our presence who in his presence and in the presence of each other and at his request, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses.


Aaron Cutler
Dec. 24, 1838
Nov. 23, 1917
and
George W. Cutler
Oct. 11, 1835
July 16, 1908

The Valley Cemetery, Londonderry, New Hampshire
1793



Thursday, May 12, 2016

American Textile History Museum -- Part 2

 American Textile History Museum
Lowell, Massachusetts
(Currently Closed -- See first post)

Welcome to the American Textile History Museum. Through these doors are period rooms, educational displays of how raw cotton or wool is made into thread or yarn and the collection of period clothes (as shown in my first post). Museum guide and my photos are below.



The lighting wasn't the best for photos, but I'm showing some of what I took.


 



Wool and Cotton




  


    
 Peeking through the window to see the general store, walk inside to see what was sold to customers (seen below).



This is a small working exhibit and they used to make items to sell in their gift shop. Things like place mats, dish towels, and napkins.

Loved the threads above and dyes below.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Notaries, A Friend Gives an Explanation.

All Saints Anglican Church, Dunham, Quebec
taken by Barbara Poole, 2000



Recently, I have been going through old research papers, and one had information about a service Pennie Redmile was offering to those doing research in Missisquoi Co., Quebec, Canada. I used her service, and we have remained friends since before 2003. Recently, I asked her if she would write a few paragraphs about Notaries. I believe my readers doing Canadian research will be interested in learning about them. Pennie is no longer doing this work, but she was willing to write about Notaries as a guest writer. Thank you, Pennie.



Notaries

Unlike other places, notaries in Quebec were responsible for many many transactions. Even to today, a will drawn up by a notary  does not need to be probated. --- Aside from wills, notaries were responsible for many  other transactions. It wasn't uncommon for a notary who worked for 40 years to have  over 100,000 documents. Aside from wills, there were marriage contracts, estate inventories (a complete list of holdings when a person died), indentures & apprenticeships, protests, (disagreements over anything from estate matters to business partnerships) all land transactions were handled by notaries, "gifts"  could be another, a father giving land or possessions to a son or daughter, or it could be a son promising to care for his parents for their lifetime. When  a person bought or sold an item -- even a horse or carriage --there likely was a   "sale".. When the army bought beef for the soldiers, there was a contract .Only once did I ever see an adoption carried out by a notary. The list is quite endless. There were many many hundreds of notaries in Quebec-- which makes finding the  records for a specific family quite daunting a task. The Montreal Archives have posted some notary indexes or repertoires to their website. An index was an alphabetical  day to day  listing of  each  transaction. However to locate a specific person , one must check the entire  listing for that letter of the alphabet. If a man had a marriage contract drawn up  & 40 years later had a will drawn up -- the two documents will be found in the time frame they were contracted.  A repertoire was a different book kept by the notary & was a day to day  chronological  listing of the events.  

Also --especially in rural areas , one will find  tutorships & curatorships in with the notary records. These are  court documents & was another fantastic provision  (not mandatory) that people could  benefit from.  When a  spouse died , the surviving  spouse could petition the court  for  a "tutor" & "sub tutor" for the minor children. The person would go to court & give  the name of the deceased  (maiden name if it was the mother)  & occupation & residence. They give the names of all minor children  & often their ages or dates of birth. If married outside Quebec, it will often state where the couple was married..  The petitioner  asks the court to appoint 3-5 men to choose the tutor. The names of the men are cited, their relationship to the minor children , their occupations & place of residence. These men  will choose a "tutor" (caregiver for the children) & it was usually the surviving parent. Then a "sub tutor" would be chosen from the men  & he would be  instantly responsible for the care of the children should the  "tutor" become ill  or die or etc.

The tutorships carry a great deal of genealogical information  & they are  held in the  nearest archives to the region  & are known in French as "tutelles". The curatorships are much the same idea-- but there are voluntary & involuntary curatorships. Some man who inherited money might request one --to have help in dealing with the  money. An involuntary  one could be a  a person who couldn't care for himself  being taken to court by family to see that he was properly cared for. It was usually family  who took on these responsibilities  when the need arose. The "curatorships" in French are called "curetelles" .  

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Bedford, Massachusetts and Seeing the WWI Memorial Once Again


Bedford is rather close to where I live and I've been by the above memorial many times. However, the trees are usually casting a shadow or shining too brightly on the war memorial. However, I lightened up my photo, so it can be read. The names are below. (My original post, dated Dec. 17, 2012 mentioned I wanted to take a better photo.)
IN MEMORY OF
THE MEN OF BEDFORD
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE WORLD WAR
AND IN APPRECIATION OF ALL THOSE WHO SERVED
TO THE CREDIT OF THEIR TOWN, STATE AND COUNTRY

*Alexander Robert Anthony     *Hugh I. Hunt      * William Walter Hamilton
Lionel Reginald Anthony
Vernon Richard Anthony
Abigail Bacon
Albert Bierenbroodspot
Andrew Cornelius Bierenbroodspot
Howard Drown Brawn
Charles Elmer Brock
Charles Elmer Brock
Thomas Butler
Roland H. Brown
Franklin Harwood Canlett
Arthur Everett Carson
Hermann Emil Christiansen
William James Crier
Frank Bellows Davis
Howard F. Davis
Clifford Louis Day, Jr.William J. Durkin
Michael Lawrence English
John Stephen Fanning
Basil Edward Fletcher
Milton Currant Ford
Benjamin Charles Freeman
Nicholas Genetti
Edward Loren Goulding
Arthur Holden Hayden
Gunnar Hemmingson
Edward Amos Hunnewell
William James Hunt
Henry Clare Isnor
William Jackson
David Theodore Keay
Francis Joseph Kelley
Henrick Hans Johan Larsen

Hubert H. Loomis
Ralph Loomis
Samuel Loomis
William F. Loomis
Francis Colin MacDonald
Walter Francis Manning
Johanna Elizabeth McMahan
Martin Francis McMahan
Philip Edward McMahan
Edward Joseph O'Dowd
Philip Stephen O'Dowd
Frederic Parker, Sr.
Henry McBurney Parker
John Stanley Parker
W. A. Parker
George Henry Peterson
J. H. Philbin
Fred A. Proctor
Paul Rhoderick Raymond
John Harold Riese
Nicholo Silverston
Peter Snyer
Frederick H. Sullivan
Nicholo Silverstone
Peter Snyer
Stephen Tackney
James J. Walsh
Rev. Arthur Stanley Wheelock
William Albert Wilkins
Harold Edward Willson


THE TOWN COMMON LANDS

WITHIN THESE LIMITS STOOD THE
FIRST MEETING HOUSE BUILT IN 1729
THE FIRST TOWN POUNT IN 1733
THE FIRST SCHOOL EST. IN 1741
THE BELL TOWER ERECTED 1753
THE MILITIA AND THE MINUTE MEN
USED THESE LANDS FOR THEIR
PARADE AND TRAINING GROUND

BEDFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY 1969

The Old Town Hall, Built 1856
The town green, looking towards Great Road / Route 4
Meeting House of the First Parish Unitarian Church
Erected 1816
Boot Scrapers (above)

Additional posts about Bedford:

43 Revolutionary War Soldiers and Widow Balch Buried in Bedford, MA

Town green to the lower left, the library, police department and school to the right. (From Google earth.)

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

American Textile History Museum, What Was Inside?

"There is A Lot to Like About Lowell" is the city slogan.

(See tab on right side called "Lowell Series" for many more articles about Lowell.)
The American Textile History Museum, on 491 Dutton Street, Lowell has been one of my favorite museums for many years, and for about five years, I volunteered there doing quite a few things. I always monitored the special exhibits, by answering non-technical questions, preventing photographs from being taken and watching what people brought in, like soft drinks, food and umbrellas. I did this every Thursday evening, from 6-8, as well when special events held on Friday or Saturday evenings in the function area (events such as company fundraisers, weddings, birthday parties, etc.), and assisted in the office of the volunteer coordinator. I met many nice women, some of whom I still see around the city.

Part 2 may be seen HERE. I have included the Museum Guide with a diagram of the building as well as a lot of period rooms.

Favorite exhibits of mine were the Princess Diana dresses (my post), a hat exhibit, Hawaiian shirts, several quilt exhibits and Hollywood costumes (my post with photo of flyer for exhibit).

Unfortunately, the museum closed the first of this year, and I haven't heard if or when they will open. If you ever wanted to see the exhibits, I can show you what I saw the week before it closed. I will do two posts, this one covers the clothes and accessories, in no particular order; the second will show the historical aspect of the museum next week.