My blog has been changed to make it more appealing for those who have New England ancestors and want to see the area through photos. Things I’ll include are typical white New England churches, libraries showing their genealogical collection, historical societies, cemeteries, war memorials, in general, anything to do with history.

For four years I’ve blogged mostly about my personal genealogy in New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire), New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. I still will, can’t forget my own roots.

Please check out the labels on the right side for articles. The header tabs at the top are a work in progress.

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

American Textile History Museum, What Was Inside?

"There is A Lot to Like About Lowell" is the city slogan.

(See tab on right side called "Lowell Series" for many more articles about Lowell.)
The American Textile History Museum, on 491 Dutton Street, Lowell has been one of my favorite museums for many years, and for about five years, I volunteered there doing quite a few things. I always monitored the special exhibits, by answering non-technical questions, preventing photographs from being taken and watching what people brought in, like soft drinks, food and umbrellas. I did this every Thursday evening, from 6-8, as well when special events held on Friday or Saturday evenings in the function area (events such as company fundraisers, weddings, birthday parties, etc.), and assisted in the office of the volunteer coordinator. I met many nice women, some of whom I still see around the city.

Favorite exhibits of mine were the Princess Diana dresses (my post), a hat exhibit, Hawaiian shirts, several quilt exhibits and Hollywood costumes (my post with photo of flyer for exhibit).

Unfortunately, the museum closed the first of this year, and I haven't heard if or when they will open. If you ever wanted to see the exhibits, I can show you what I saw the week before it closed. I will do two posts, this one covers the clothes and accessories, in no particular order; the second will show the historical aspect of the museum next week.





































Monday, May 2, 2016

Visiting the Monuments and Old North Bridge 57 Years Ago!

My mother's college friend, Mrs. Williams and her two daughters came to visit us in Lexington in 1958. We had already lived in that town for about four years, so I am quite certain the 1958 visit wasn't my first time there. One of the daughters, Dee Williams Malan and I were about the same age and when I lived in Alexandria, VA, she did too. We saw each other often, and once she came to Lowell,  MA for a quick visit. I am in the middle back, mother on the right and my two sisters are in front.

HERE
On the 19 of April
1775
was made
the first forcible resistance
to British aggression
On the opposite Bank
stood the American Militia
HERE stood the Invading Army
and on this spot
the first of the Enemy fell
in the War of that Revolution
which gave
Independence
to these United States
In gratitude to GOD
and
In the love and Freedom
this Monument
was erected AD 1836.

Below photos taken 2013, 2015, Concord, Massachusetts.
I never knew the name of this monument, so Wikipedia came to the rescue. It appears it's just called the 1836 Monument. While on that site, I discovered some other very interesting bits of information, shared below:

"Bridge

The original North Bridge was dismantled in 1793 by the town of Concord because its use as a bridge had become impractical; a new bridge was erected a few hundred yards away. The bridge was rebuilt multiple times in 1875, 1889, and 1909. The current replica was built in 1956 and was based on drawings of the bridge built in the 1760s. The bridge was restored in 2005.

1836 memorial (above)

In 1836, when there was no bridge at the site, the residents of Concord erected a memorial obelisk on the east side of the river, the side closest to the town center. Inscribed on the eastern (approach) side of the monument is: "HERE On the 19 of April, 1775, was made the first forcible resistance to British aggression[.] On the opposite Bank stood the American Militia[.] Here stood the Invading Army and on this spot the first of the Enemy fell in the War of that Revolution which gave Independence to these United States[.] In gratitude to GOD and In the love of Freedom this Monument was erected AD. 1836."
On Independence Day, July 4, 1837, the memorial was dedicated, an event for which Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote his "Concord Hymn". The first, and best known, of the four stanzas of this poem is:
By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April's breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world.

1875 memorial (below)

The first stanza of "Concord Hymn" is inscribed at the base of the statue Minute Man by Daniel Chester French. The statue, which stands on a 7-foot-tall granite pedestal, was cast in the Ames Foundry in Chicopee, Massachusetts and was made from seven American Civil Warcannons donated for the project by Congress. The statue, and the 1875 bridge, were dedicated on April 19, 1875 at a centennial recognition of the original battle of April 19, 1775."

1875 Memorial, more commonly known as the Minuteman Statue.

Past photo posts about the North Bridge Visitor Center, park and bridge in Concord, seen HERE and HERE. In reviewing the photos, I don't think I need to take any more photos!

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Glastonbury, Connecticut -- Kilborn Ancestor Buried There Plus See the World War II Memorial


A visit to the Green Cemetery in Glastonbury, Connecticut on April 17th proved to be the most frustrating hunt for a stone I've ever had in all 100 or so cemeteries I've been in. I thought I was so well prepared as I had a copy of my John Kilbourn /Kilborn stone beautifully photographed for FindAGrave (FAG) by Rebecca, and I knew the row and exact location of the stone. So what happened? I was armed with an iPad and a small Sony aim and shoot camera, but I couldn't read any writing on a large number of stones. The shadow is exactly in the same place as the FAG photo below. When you compare the two pictures, I'd love some feedback. Do you think it was taken in another month or is there another reason? I wonder if Rebecca will respond to my query as to what month she was there, even though she posted her photo in 2007!

From the photo below, I thought it was taken at 11:57 AM, but in fact I was in error. After I posted my original post, I realized that that time was due to my taking a copy of the FAG photo with my iPad. Thank you to the two who commented on why there could have been a difference of 3 minutes, since my horrible picture was taken at 11:54. The idea of a flash being used was a good suggestion, but I think since you see a shadow, like mine, that might not be a reason. Perhaps it was the time of the year.

I have taken cemetery photos of John's 7 of direct line of Kilborn, all in Connecticut (Colchester, East Haddam, Clinton, and New Haven). John Kilborn's father was probably buried across the river in Wethersfield per FAG.

John Kilbourn is my 8th great-grandfather. There are 21 Kilbourns or Kilborns in that cemetery and I could only read three! The stone reads

HERE
Lieth The
Body of Mr. Jno
Kilborn Who Died
November ye 25th 1711
in ye 60th year of His
Age
FAG photo above, not taken at 11:57 AM
Mine below was taken at 11:54 AM
Changing it to black and white helped a little, at least I can see a few words.

Inside the fence are the row numbers. I called the Historical Society and got the exact location.
Green Cemetery has many entrances, not just the one shown.


The Historical Society of Glastonbury is next to the Cemetery. This was the original town hall built in 1840. The war memorial is in front of the town hall.
IN HONOR OF THOSE WHO SERVED THEIR
COUNTRY IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND IN MEMORY OF
CHARLES GALLI WHO WAS KILLED IN ACTION.
HERBERT AMOND
RICHARD A. BANTLE
EVERETT E. BANTLY
ALLEN F. BEHNKE
ROBERT G. BRASH
CHARLES W. CHASE, JR.
JOSEPH A. CLAPIS
LAWRENCE L. COGGIOLA
ELMORE L. CORNISH
MARY L. CORNISH
JACK DARBY
GEORGE E. ELLIOTT, JR.
WILLIAM J. ELLIOTT
DURAND G. FULLER
CHARLES GALLI
ALBERT A. GEOFFROY
CHARLES M. GODDARD, JR.
DANIEL H. HODGE
ALBERT K. KARASH, JR.
VINCENT KASPER
WALTER KERR
JOSEPH KIRK
FRANK J. LEACH
EGIDIO F. MARINELLI
JACK E. MAY
RICHARD A. MERRIAM
EDWARD J. MILLER
HENRY J. MORSE
GUIDOI OLIVA
LAWRENCE W. RICHARDS
WALTER J. STANLEY
JOSEPH F. STARK
LUCIEN VEGIARD
JOSEPH J. WACHTER, JR.
EDWARD D. WELDON
JOSEPH F. WESTERGOM
ERECTED 1947

Town green is beside the cemetery and behind the Historical Society.







Saturday, April 16, 2016

Memorials Written for my Mother and Her Revised Will to Benefit 6 Non-Profit Organizations

A newspaper obituary written about my mother was titled, "The Ultimate Volunteer, " I blogged about that obituary five years ago, see HERE. Now, 26 years after her April 16, 2016 death, I am posting three memorial articles to my mother. From the obituary, "She died of a heart attack, at the age of 70, doing what she loved, leading a group of bicyclists on an annual Patriot's Day bike ride in Lincoln [sic] (should be Lexington)."

Alan Dressler, Marta Gredler and Sharon Cain wrote memorial articles and Jean H. James wrote the Memorial Ride in my mother's name. Part of what they wrote are these statements: "Just a few of her activities: the Presidency of her Skidmore college class; Westford (MA) teacher; AARP; the Concord Piece-makers (her quilting group); Boy Scout recycling drives; Rails to Trails projects; and of course Bicycling with the Nashoba Valley Pedalers." "Long-time volunteer of the New England Quilt Museum." Personally, I know she was a Girl Scout volunteer and for several years the Sunday School volunteer administrator.

Her revised will dated 1 March 1990, just 6 weeks prior to her death and a few months before a scheduled trip to France, replaced her original one prepared in ca. 1955. She thought so much about her love of the Church, Rails to Trails, New England Quilt Museum, Friends of the Acton Council on Aging, Northfield Mt. Hermon School (where she attended a private high school), and Skidmore College that she left each of them 1/6 of 1/4 of her estate.
Marta