My blog has been changed to make it more appealing for those who have New England ancestors and want to see the area through photos. Things I’ll include are typical white New England churches, libraries showing their genealogical collection, historical societies, cemeteries, war memorials, in general, anything to do with history.

For four years I’ve blogged mostly about my personal genealogy in New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire), New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Wyoming, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. I still will, can’t forget my own roots.

Please check out the labels on the right side for articles. The header tabs at the top are a work in progress.

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Massachussetts Vital Records Birth Record News

Michael Brophy just sent the following message to a local genealogy club, and probably to others, and I felt his information was interesting and helpful, especially for those doing research here.


I quickly wrote him to obtain permission to copy his message to my blog. He kindly gave approval. Michael's blogs are at Brophy Professional Genealogy and Heir Tracing and Brophy's Irish Genealogy Blog.


"While visiting the Massachusetts Vital Records Office in Boston yesterday, I discovered that the registry has now made birth records available online inside the registry for the first time. The years covered are 1953-1986 and do not include marriage or death records. There is not remote access at this time.


This service improvement should held researchers work more efficiently in the often crowded and under serviced research room. The new access to the records eliminates the limitation on viewing these records by waiting for a "call for slips" after obtaining a volume and page number from an index. The registry charges a step fee of nine dollars per hour to access vital records in the research room and has cut down on their research hours in recent years.


Secretary Nyberg of the Vital Records said that future plans for the project are to expand access. In a tour of the Vital Records Registry in 2009 by the New England Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists, he said that the goal is to have the records viewable at town halls throughout the state."


Michael Brophy

4 comments:

Heather Rojo said...

That is great news! Last fall, at the Vital Records, I spent a painful hour there in line with someone applying for Mayflower papers. Only one person ahead of us, and it took that long before we were out the door. Incredible.

Barbara Poole said...

Thanks Heather for writing. This is a step in the right direction.

Wendy said...

Oh wow, what good news! I have always wanted to visit the Vital Records office, and it is great to know that so much more is available now.

Yvette Porter Moore said...

Thank you for sharing the good news!