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My blog has been changed to make it more appealing for those who have New England ancestors and want to see the area through photos. Things I’ll include are typical white New England churches, libraries showing their genealogical collection, historical societies, cemeteries, war memorials, in general, anything to do with history.

For four years I’ve blogged mostly about my personal genealogy in New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire), New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. I still will, can’t forget my own roots.

Please check out the labels on the right side for articles. The header tabs at the top are a work in progress.

Monday, May 11, 2015

Don't Always Think A FindAGrave Photo is Going to Look Like the Actual Stone or Be Correct!

When I learned that my 9th great-grandfather, Rev. Thomas Carter was buried in the Old Burying Ground in Woburn, Massachusetts, and I knew I had to go find his tombstone. Although Woburn is about a 40 minute ride from my house, I had never been to the cemetery, but I have been to the library where I did a post on their genealogy holdings.

I thought I had two things going for me for this cemetery visit. I knew it was a small cemetery and FindAGrave (FAG) had a picture of the tombstone. Below, is the FAG grave photo I used with the app on my iPad. It's always a good thing to take along the picture, if you are fortunate enough to find one on that site.

The search proved to be more difficult than I expected. As you can see from the below photos, the cemetery was on a steep hill, which made walking a tad difficult, and I couldn't locate a stone looking like the FAG photo of Rev. Carter, shown below.
Photo from the FAG iPad app

After much searching, I found a similar, yet taller stone, which I couldn't read, but thought it could be the same as the one pictured on FAG because of the shape and broken edge on the left side, but they weren't the same size. I couldn't read it until I got home and used Adobe Photoshop for tweaking, then I was able to partially read the engraving. I am not sure why the FAG image looks so short, but this proves another photographer's shot can be very different than yours.
What did I discover when I compared pictures and facts? This is not the stone for the Rev. Thomas Carter, who died in 1684. I believe the entry on FAG is incorrect for two reasons. First the stone states this person died in March (not the correct date of September 05, 1684). Second, there is no entry for Rev. Thomas Carter in the book, Woburn Records of Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Marriage Intentions, from 1640 to 1900 by Edward F. Johnson. (Includes a listing of all the burials and epitaphs.) See write-up of the oldest John Carter stone in the cemetery, shown below. Since Reverend Carter died in 1684 and there is no stone for him, nor mention in the above book, I believe the photo shown is incorrect.

There were several plaques in the cemetery, one bearing a relative's name, Eleazer Flagg Poole.
1775          1783
IN MEMORIAM
REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS
PARK STREET BURIAL-GROUND

BALDWIN LOAMMI
1807
POOLE ELEAZER FLAGG
1776
BROOKS ZACHARIAH
1792
PORTER ASAHEL
1775
BURBEEN JOSEPH
1794
RHODES JACOB
1776
FOWLE JAMES
1779
RICHARDSON EBENEZER
1783
FROTHINGHAM THOMAS
1776
RICHARDSOSN STEPHEN
1783
GARDNER SAMUEL
1790
RICHARDSON STEPHEN
1787
LAMSON JOHN
1776
SIMONDS BENJAMIN
1783
THOMPSON DANIEL     1775

In Memoriam
Deacon Edward Convers
Born W. Kerry, County of Northampton
England, January 30, 1590
Landed: Salem, Mass. June 12, 1630
in company of Governor Winthrop
Died Woburn, Mass. August 10, 1663
Founder: City of Woburn, Mass.
And First Church, Woburn
Forefather of
The Converse Family in America
Erected in his Memory
By His Descendants
The Converse Family in America
1962
First Burial Ground
1642 Until 1794
Daniel Thompson and Asahel Porter,
Both Casualties of the Battles
of Lexington and Concord
Lie Interred Here and Many
Important Early Woburnites
There is a nice blog post about Rev. Carter done by cousin Pam Carter, in her My Maine Ancestry seen HERE.

2 comments:

Pam Carter said...

Thank you for mentioning my blog. I found this story both interesting and a very helpful reminder to go out and do your own research. I saw quite a few redirects coming from your site. I'm behind on reading blogs since I've been working with my students on family history projects.

Barbara Poole said...

Pam, you didn't need to thank me, but I am glad you saw my post. At some point, I would have told you. Oh, I'm behind in blog reading also, and I don't even have students!