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My blog has been changed to make it more appealing for those who have New England ancestors and want to see the area through photos. Things I’ll include are typical white New England churches, libraries showing their genealogical collection, historical societies, cemeteries, war memorials, in general, anything to do with history.

For four years I’ve blogged mostly about my personal genealogy in New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire), New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. I still will, can’t forget my own roots.

Please check out the labels on the right side for articles. The header tabs at the top are a work in progress.

Saturday, November 14, 2015

If you Like Louis Comfort Tiffany, you will love this Boston House!

In May, I wrote about the beautiful old Frederick F. Ayer house, also known as the Franco American School in Lowell, Massachusetts. The following month, I went to Boston to tour the house Frederick had built in 1899-1903 by Louis Comfort Tiffany. What a treasure, and I hadn't even known it existed. Tours are held several times a month, you need to register and the cost is $10.
The grand staircase is made of marble and the wall covering was done in gold colored small pieces of tile (more photos and detailed history may be seen at this LINK.)
The Ayer Mansion is located at 395 Massachusetts Avenue is very modern looking, even though it was built in 1902.
Front entrance, looking out at Commonwealth Avenue and park.
This is the front parlor where the lecture began. The house is still being renovated, so we just saw a few rooms, but that was okay because everybody was in awe at what they saw.



Sample of tile work, and lovely ceiling lights and staircase.

Round table and chairs designed by Louis C. Tiffany.
In the above room is where George S. Patton proposed to Beatrice Ayer.
Daughters, Beatrice Banning Ayer (later married George S. Patton) and Mary Katherine "Kay."

Photos of Frederick and Ellen Barrows Banning Ayer.
The front entrance, with doors closed, showing the original green Tiffany glass. Spectacular!

The Ayer house from across the street, and a view of Boston from the park.


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